HZS Training - Environmental Protection

///Environmental Protection
Environmental Protection 2017-12-01T15:59:00+00:00

Environment Sampling

Introduction

How a sample is taken from the environment is key in identifying it’s composition and as such is tied to the analytical method employed to identify it.

There are many sampling methodologies, based on statistic processing, equipment and as well as ensuring the chain of custody if required.

Key factors to determine a good sample include:

  1. An understanding of the sample to be taken; natural / non natural.
  2. Concentrations and the effect of sampling equipment.
  3. Sorption of the substance in relation to sample media.
  4. Analytical interferences.

All this relates to the necessity to design and adhere to a structured sampling plan, our training focuses on taking the sample in the correct way and delivering it to the laboratory without loss .. in other words, as it was found.

Substances Used

Sampling practice will be done in the first instance with non-harmful substances and then controlled quantities of harmful substances commonly found in the environment using a selection of different matrixes; these include:

A) pesticides
B) heavy metals
C) organic industrial solvents
D) polychlorinated biphenyl – PCB
E) asbestos sampling
F) depleted uranium
G) microbiological sampling (non pathogenic)

The matrixes which will be processed are: soil, water, air and silt in water.

Course Structure

The course is divided into 3 parts:

1. Sampling Theory:

  • The characteristics of the given compounds and potential locations.
  • Toxic characteristics of each compound group
  • Matrixes attributes, relative to analytical techniques
  • Characteristics of microbiological contamination and microorganisms.
  • Microbiological sampling techniques

2. Demonstrations

  • Using typical environmental sampling equipment in a laboratory setting.
  • Development of a Sampling Plan for on site phase

3. On Site Sampling

  • Conducted on a selected industry location in real conditions where students will execute their
    sampling plan.
Course Duration

2 Weeks – to include Saturday mornings

Departure / Arrival on Sundays
(Can be adjusted if required)

Minimum number of students – 10

Analysis Of Environmental Samples

Introduction

Analytical procedures for determining of pollutants in the environment are known and recognized as standard analytical procedures, however, determining individual compounds in natural samples can represent challenges and difficulties even for experienced analysts. Samples from the environment demand through preparation and an in depth knowledge of the analysts instrumentation.

Common difficulties for the analytical chemist include:

  1. Natural samples are complex mixtures so the sample preparations should be specific to sample media and targeted substance.
  2. Concentrations may have to be intensified.
  3. Many natural chemical events act as interferons
  4. Requirement to know the law where the findings maybe used in a prosecution
Substances used

Analytical practice will be done in the first instance with non-harmful substances and then controlled quantities of harmful substances commonly found in the environment using a selection of different matrixes; these include:

A) pesticides
B) heavy metals
C) organic industrial solvents
D) polychlorinated biphenyl – PCB
E) mineral oils
F) depleted uranium

The matrixes which will be processed are: soil, water, air and silt in water.

Course structure

The course is divided into 3 parts:

1. Analytical Theory:

  • The characteristics of the given compounds and potential locations.
  • Toxic characteristics of each compound group
  • Matrixes attributes, relative to analytical techniques
  • Selection of analytical techniques
  • Analyzing individual groups of compounds in the given matrixes
  • Characteristics of microbiological contamination and microorganisms.
  • Analyzing microbiological samples
  • Environmental Protection Environmental Protection

2. Demonstrations

Instrumental and classic techniques for determining all of the given compound groups in
given matrixes; to include

  • Gas chromatography with ECD and FID
  • Mass spectrometry
  • HPLC and ion chromatography
  • Infrared spectroscopy
  • Atomic absorption spectroscopy: graphite tube, flame, hydride and cold steam technique
  • ICP-OS

3. On Site Sampling / Analysis

The matrixes which will be processed are: soil, water, air and silt in water from a chosen industrial locality. Samples will be taken and analyzed for given parameters in MOL institute.

Course duration

2 Weeks – to include Saturday mornings
Departure / Arrival on Sundays (Can be adjusted if required)
Minimum number of students – 10

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